Powdered dog lice and crab eyes

“A typical physician attending the insane in 17th century America administered an assortment of concoctions made from such ingredients as human saliva and perspiration, earthworms, powdered dog lice, or crab eyes. Special importance was attributed to an herb called St. John’s wort which was blessed, wrapped in paper, and inhaled to ward off attacks from the devil. LiceAstrological lore found expression in prescriptions: one physician instructed that bloodletting and blistering be timed with phases of the moon; another called for boiling live toads in March and then pulverizing them into powder, a delicacy credited with preventing and curing all kinds of diseases. From his medical treatises the doctor might prescribe ancient and medieval remedies. Hellebore, an herb used by the ancient Greeks to cure mental disorders, was specified as being “good for mad and furious men.”  A preparation known as “spirit of skull” involved mixing wine with moss taken from the skull of an unburied man who had met a violent death. Hot human blood, as well as pulverized human hearts or brains, presumably helped control “fits.” While these prescriptions represented the best-known “cures,” the nauseating quality of the mixtures suggests that the remedy rather than the illness was the more formidable obstacle to recovery.Crab eyes Vomiting may actually have been helpful, and certainly had powerful psychological effects. In any event, the “cures” reflect the state of medical knowledge in colonial America, a time when physicians and laymen read and use the same medical recipe books. Most doctors remained preoccupied with commonalities and epidemics.”

This excerpt is from Treating the Mentally Ill: From Colonial Times to the Present, a great book with a boring cover that I suspect you’d have a difficult time finding (if you indeed wanted to hunt down a copy).

In a hundred years what treatments that we use now to treat major mental illness might end up in such a list?  Will clozapine, with all its side effects, be seen as having been a misguided remedy? (and I think clozapine is the best! click to read more).

I teach a bit of history next month to psych residents.  I’ll get the residents to read another quote from this same book by Leland V. Bell where he writes of how “psychiatry has supported a bewildering array of therapeutics that have followed a roller-coaster pattern of fashionability” (Read and watch more at Cycling History)

My goal is not to make trainees cynical about psychiatric treatment but to make them humble. Physicians should always be a bit skeptical.  One needs to find the balance point between therapeutic optimism  and humility.  We understand so much more about the brain than a century ago; and yet there’s still a huge amount to learn.  I think we’re doing better than powdered dog lice, or crab eyes but let’s wait a hundred years just to make sure.

Shalom Coodin

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