Train ’em and Pay ’em

Can mental health consumers act as teachers for mental health professionals? Should they? If so do they have the pedagogical skills to be educators?

In a 2014 paper titled Consumer involvement in the tertiary-level education of mental health professionals: A systematic review the authors look at the research on this. Interestingly the first citation is of a Judy Chamberlain paper – (see my recent post).

While it’s important to research how to best involve consumers in teaching perhaps it’s time to, as a certain footwear company recommends, just do it!

First we have to recognise the value of lived experiences. On the issue of what we call patients (yes, I am a physician and I still use this term to remind me of my role) I’m increasingly comfortable with the title of Expert By Experience (see my blog I Got A Name on this)   Consumer, client and patient all have validity.  But when a patient asks what I think they should do – whether it’s to use or not use a medication for example, or to try returning to work – usually, before me answering, I’ll point out that my patient is truly the expert. They’ve lived with depression, PTSD, anxiety, psychosis, addiction or all of the above.

It’s well past time for psychiatry residency programs to have included consumers as instructors.  I suggest a plan on how to do this.  Step 1 – Pay Them!  I don’t work pro bono, why would we ask consumers to do so? Step 2 – Train Them!  One of the fallacies in Medicine is that by virtue of going through medical school and then a residency that you automatically acquire teaching skills along the way.  That ain’t necessarily so.  I don’t really know if I’m any good as a teacher – I certainly would have valued learning more about how to be a better teacher.  Medical schools have increasingly recognized this, offering teaching faculty training in how to be better educators.Apple

Just being a mental health consumer or expert by experience doesn’t necessarily make one a good teacher. There are individuals who are better able to articulate and communicate than others.   We need to invite, entice and did I mention PAY those consumers and involve them in ongoing training, not one-off seminars.

I have no doubt that there are such individuals out there because I’ve met them.  We psychiatrists may not like all of what they have to say but that can make for more interesting conversations.

Can those with the most severe, disabling illnesses – ACT clients – be part of this? Yes, I think there are some.  And ACT clinicians, who know their clients so well, would be a great resource for identifying individuals who might take on the role of becoming educators.

It’s way past time.  As I near the end of my career I’m saddened to see so little having been achieved in my community on this.  Maybe the next generation.

Shalom Coodin MD FRCPC

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